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Temporal and spatial variations in breeding success of peregrine falcons in southeastern Scotland 1963-2009

2010Temporal and spatial variations in breeding success of peregrine falcons in southeastern Scotland 1963-2009.CONCEPCION Camille (Philippines)cbconcepcion@gmail.com
Organisation:University of East Anglia, Norwich (UK)Supervisor :Mark Hassall
Summary: Long-term monitoring data (1964 to 2009) of the peregrine falcon population in the regions of Lothian and Borders was used to study the environmental drivers of variations in site occupancy and breeding success. Significant variation was found in occupancy and clutch size of birds using coastal cliffs and those using inland, core areas. Birds using sites that were first occupied in more recent years consistently showed better nestling survivorship and productivity than those using sites first occupied in earlier years. Mixed-effects models were used to establish environmental predictors for site occupancy, clutch size, egg viability and nestling survivorship of breeding birds using 110 sites. Occupancy increased with time, showing preference for nest sites with southsouthwest orientation. Coastal cliffs, nest sites facing east-northeast and sites in keepered grounds were less preferred. Clutch size varied significantly between coastal and inland sites but was not explained solely by environmental drivers. Egg viability and nestling survivorship increased with time. Both were influenced by monthly mean daily temperatures reflecting the capacity of the egg and chick to survive thermal stress.
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